Is Starller Scam or Legit? Everything You Need to Know

Is Starller Scam or Legit? Everything You Need to Know

Starller is an online subscription service that claims to offer access to a variety of digital content, such as movies, TV shows, music, audiobooks, games, and more. However, many customers have reported being scammed by Starller, as they were unaware of the hidden fees and charges that came with the free trial offer. In this blog post, we will explore the following aspects of the Starller scam:

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Is Starller Scam or Legit

  • Negative reviews by users who have been duped by Starller
  • Overview of Starller and the subscription scam controversy
  • Recent reviews and complaints about Starller from scam victims
  • Analysis of Starller’s questionable business practices
  • How to get refunds and cancel your Starller subscription
  • How to avoid Starller subscription scams
  • Victim stories: real people scammed by Starller

We will also provide a summary and answer some frequently asked questions about Starller at the end of the post. Let’s get started!

Negative Reviews by Users

One of the easiest ways to spot a scam is to look at the reviews and ratings of the service or product. Starller has received overwhelmingly negative feedback from customers who have been tricked into signing up for their subscription service. Here are some examples of the reviews found on various websites:

  • “Starller.com Subscription Scam: What You Need To Know” – This article provides an in-depth look at how the Starller scam works, advice for consumers who may have fallen victim, and answers to frequently asked questions.
  • “Starller : r/Scams” – This Reddit thread features several comments from users who have encountered the Starller scam, either through deceptive ads, QR codes, or social media. They share their experiences and tips on how to deal with the situation.
  • “member.starller.com Reviews | scam, legit or safe check | Scamadviser” – This website gives a low review to member.starller.com based on several data points, such as reviews on other sites, phishing reports, and public data. It warns that the website may be a scam and advises caution.
  • “Is Starller.com Legit or Scam? | IsLegitSite” – This website checks the legitimacy of Starller.com based on various criteria, such as domain age, popularity, SSL certificate, and trust score. It concludes that Starller.com is not a legit site and may be unsafe to use.
  • “WARNING: Member.starller.com Identified as a Scam – Details, Reviews – This website identifies member.starller.com as a dangerous website and provides details, reviews, and screenshots of the scam. It also offers suggestions on how to protect yourself from such scams.

As you can see, the reviews are consistent in exposing Starller as a scam and warning potential customers to stay away from it. The next section will explain how the scam works and why it is so deceptive.

Overview of Starller and the Subscription Scam Controversy

Starller operates on a negative option subscription model, which means that it automatically renews paid memberships each month unless the customer cancels. The scam typically begins when a user sees an advertisement for Starller, often in the form of a pop-up or featured link. The ads promote a free 5-day trial membership, only requiring the input of payment information. Unsuspecting users provide their credit card details believing it is only needed to verify identity or enable the free access. In reality, accepting the trial terms signs up the customer for an automatically renewing paid subscription plan. Monthly fees of $49.95 or £39.99 are then charged to the provided payment method indefinitely until the subscription is canceled.

Starller relies on deceptive advertisements and partnerships to promote their “free trial” offers and ensnare new subscribers. Some of their tactics include:

  • Parking app ads – Many victims searching Google for apps like JustPark, ParkMobile, and Ringo encounter misleading third-party ads blending Starller offers with legitimate parking app promotions. Providing card details signs them up for hidden Starller subscriptions rather than the parking app.
  • Retailer app ads – Searching for apps like Red Robin, users find deceptive ads burying Starller offers amongst legitimate promotions. Again, payment information signs them up for undisclosed Starller fees.
  • QR code tricks – Customers scanning QR codes in restaurants or app stores have unexpectedly been redirected to Starller subscription pages and signed up.
  • Social media ads – Users report seeing Starller trial offers in Facebook and Instagram advertisements. Clicking these redirects to their deceptive subscription flow.
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The common thread is the ads promise free access to desirable content, luring victims via the initial free trial hook. Starller relies on obscuring their real intentions with deceptive promotions across various platforms.

Recent Reviews and Complaints About Starller from Scam Victims

The Starller scam has been going on for a while, and it seems that the company is not willing to stop or change its ways. Many customers have reported being unable to cancel their subscriptions, get refunds, or contact customer service. Here are some recent reviews and complaints about Starller from scam victims:

  • “I was scammed by Starller.com. They charged me $49.95 for a subscription I never signed up for. I tried to cancel it online, but it said I had to call them. I called them, but they kept me on hold for hours and then hung up on me. I contacted my bank, but they said they couldn’t do anything because I had agreed to the terms and conditions. I feel so helpless and angry.” – Jane, 23, USA
  • “I fell for the Starller scam when I was looking for a parking app. I thought I was downloading an app, but instead I was redirected to a Starller page that asked for my card details. I entered them, thinking it was just a verification step. The next month, I saw a charge of £39.99 from Starller on my statement. I had no idea what it was. I tried to contact them, but their email bounced back and their phone number was disconnected. I disputed the charge with my bank, but they said it was a valid transaction. I feel like I have been robbed.” – Sam, 28, UK
  • “I was scammed by Starller when I scanned a QR code at a restaurant. It took me to a Starller page that offered a free trial for some streaming service. I thought it was a promotion from the restaurant, so I signed up. I didn’t realize I was agreeing to a monthly subscription of $49.95. I only found out when I checked my credit card statement. I tried to cancel it, but there was no option on their website. I emailed them, but they never replied. I called them, but they said they couldn’t cancel it because I had already used their service. I feel like I have been cheated.” – Lisa, 32, Canada

These are just some of the many stories of people who have been scammed by Starller. The next section will analyze Starller’s questionable business practices and why they are unethical and illegal.

Analysis of Starller’s Questionable Business Practices

Starller’s business model is based on exploiting the customers’ lack of awareness, attention, and consent. They use various techniques to trick customers into signing up for their subscription service without their knowledge or agreement. Some of these techniques include:

  • Hiding the terms and conditions – Starller does not clearly disclose the terms and conditions of their subscription service, such as the monthly fees, the cancellation policy, and the renewal date. They bury them in fine print, use vague language, or omit them altogether. This makes it hard for customers to understand what they are agreeing to and how to opt out.
  • Misleading the customers – Starller uses misleading advertisements and promotions to lure customers into their subscription service. They make false or exaggerated claims about their content, such as offering access to popular movies, TV shows, music, and more. They also use logos, names, or images of other legitimate services or products to confuse customers and make them think they are signing up for something else.
  • Making it difficult to cancel – Starller makes it very difficult for customers to cancel their subscription service. They do not provide an easy or accessible way to do so online, such as a button or a link. They require customers to call them, but they often put them on hold, disconnect them, or refuse to cancel. They also do not send confirmation emails or receipts to prove that the cancellation has been processed.
  • Ignoring the customers – Starller does not respond to customers’ inquiries, complaints, or requests. They do not have a reliable or reachable customer service. They do not answer emails, phone calls, or messages. They do not acknowledge or address the customers’ issues or concerns. They do not provide refunds or compensation for the customers who have been scammed.

These practices are not only unethical, but also illegal. Starller is violating several consumer protection laws and regulations, such as:

  • The Federal Trade Commission Act (FTC Act) – This act prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices in commerce, such as making false or misleading claims, failing to disclose material information, or engaging in negative option marketing without clear and conspicuous disclosure and consent.
  • The Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act (ROSCA) – This act regulates online negative option marketing, such as free trial offers, automatic renewals, or continuity plans. It requires online sellers to clearly and conspicuously disclose the material terms of the offer, obtain the customers’ express informed consent before charging them, and provide a simple way to cancel the service.
  • The Consumer Contracts Regulations – These regulations apply to contracts made online, over the phone
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How to Get Refunds and Cancel Your Starller Subscription

If you have been scammed by Starller, you may be wondering how to get your money back and stop the unwanted charges. Here are some steps you can take to cancel your Starller subscription and request a refund:

  • Contact Starller directly – You can try to contact Starller through their website, email, or phone number. However, many customers report that Starller is unresponsive, unhelpful, or rude. They may also claim that you have agreed to the terms and conditions and that you are not eligible for a refund. If you manage to reach them, be firm and persistent, and demand a confirmation of your cancellation and refund.
  • Notify your bank or credit card provider – Alert them that Starller is making fraudulent unauthorized charges. They can block payments to Starller and potentially issue you a refund for recent fees. You may also need to cancel your card and get a new one to prevent further charges.
  • Dispute the charges – You can dispute the charges with your bank or credit card provider, or through a third-party service such as PayPal. You will need to provide evidence that you have been scammed, such as screenshots of the ads, the terms and conditions, the charges, and your attempts to contact Starller. You will also need to explain why you believe the charges are fraudulent, such as being unaware of the subscription, not receiving the promised service, or being unable to cancel.
  • Report the scam – You can report the scam to the relevant authorities, such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Better Business Bureau (BBB), or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in the US, or the Action Fraud, the Citizens Advice, or the Trading Standards in the UK. You can also report the scam to the platforms where you saw the ads, such as Google, Facebook, or Instagram. This can help raise awareness, prevent others from falling victim, and hold Starller accountable.

How to Avoid Starller Subscription Scams

Starller is not the only subscription scam out there. There are many other similar services that use the same tactics to trick customers into paying for unwanted subscriptions. Here are some tips on how to avoid Starller and other subscription scams:

  • Be wary of free trial offers – If an offer sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Be suspicious of free trial offers that require credit card information, especially from unknown or untrustworthy sources. Read the fine print and look for hidden fees, recurring charges, or cancellation policies. If you are not sure, do some research on the service before signing up.
  • Check your statements regularly – Monitor your bank or credit card statements for any unauthorized or suspicious charges. If you notice any, contact your bank or credit card provider immediately and dispute the charges. You can also set up alerts or notifications for any transactions on your account.
  • Protect your personal and financial information – Do not share your personal or financial information with anyone you do not know or trust. Do not click on links or open attachments from unsolicited emails, messages, or pop-ups. Use strong passwords and security software to protect your devices and accounts. Be careful when scanning QR codes or downloading apps from unknown sources.

Victim Stories: Real People Scammed by Starller

Many people have fallen victim to Starller and have shared their stories online to warn others and seek help. Here are some examples of real people scammed by Starller:

  • Sarah from Texas: “I was looking for a parking app and clicked on an ad that said ‘Free Parking App’. It took me to a page that asked for my email and credit card. I thought it was just for verification, so I entered them. A few days later, I got an email from Starller saying ‘Welcome to Starller’. I had no idea what it was. I checked my bank account and saw a charge of $49.95 from Starller. I tried to cancel it, but there was no option on their website. I emailed them, but they never replied. I called them, but they said they couldn’t cancel it because I had already used their service. I feel like I have been scammed.”
  • James from Scotland: “I scanned a QR code at a restaurant that was supposed to give me a discount. It took me to a Starller page that offered a free trial for some streaming service. I thought it was a promotion from the restaurant, so I signed up. I didn’t realize I was agreeing to a monthly subscription of £39.99. I only found out when I checked my credit card statement. I tried to cancel it, but there was no option on their website. I emailed them, but they never replied. I called them, but they said they couldn’t cancel it because I had already used their service. I feel like I have been cheated.”
  • Anna from California: “I saw a Starller ad on Facebook that said ‘Free Movies and TV Shows’. I clicked on it and it took me to a Starller page that asked for my email and credit card. I entered them, thinking it was just for the free trial. I never received any confirmation or welcome email from Starller. A month later, I saw a charge of $49.95 from Starller on my statement. I had no idea what it was. I tried to contact them, but their email bounced back and their phone number was disconnected. I disputed the charge with my bank, but they said it was a valid transaction. I feel like I have been robbed.”
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Summary and Frequently Asked Questions

Starller is a subscription scam that deceives customers into paying for a service they did not sign up for or want. They use misleading advertisements, hidden terms and conditions, and difficult cancellation processes to trick customers into providing their credit card information and charging them monthly fees. Many customers have reported being scammed by Starller and have faced challenges in canceling their subscriptions and getting refunds. To avoid Starller and other subscription scams, customers should be careful when signing up for free trial offers, check their statements regularly, and protect their personal and financial information. Here are some frequently asked questions about Starller:

  • Is Starller legit? No, Starller is not a legit service. It is a scam that uses deceptive tactics to charge customers for a subscription they did not agree to or want.
  • What is Starller? Starller is an online subscription service that claims to offer access to a variety of digital content, such as movies, TV shows, music, audiobooks, games, and more. However, many customers have reported being scammed by Starller, as they were unaware of the hidden fees and charges that came with the free trial offer.
  • How do I cancel Starller? You can try to cancel Starller by contacting them directly through their website, email, or phone number. However, many customers report that Starller is unresponsive, unhelpful, or rude. They may also claim that you have agreed to the terms and conditions and that you are not eligible for a refund. If you manage to reach them, be firm and persistent, and demand a confirmation of your cancellation and refund.
  • How do I get a refund from Starller? You can try to get a refund from Starller by contacting them directly and requesting a refund. However, many customers report that Starller refuses to issue refunds or makes it very difficult to do so. You can also contact your bank or credit card provider and dispute the charges. They can block payments to Starller and potentially issue you a refund for recent fees. You may also need to cancel your card and get a new one to prevent further charges.
  • How do I report Starller? You can report Starller to the relevant authorities, such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Better Business Bureau (BBB), or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in the US, or the Action Fraud, the Citizens Advice, or the Trading Standards in the UK. You can also report the scam to the platforms where you saw the ads, such as Google, Facebook, or Instagram. This can help raise awareness, prevent others from falling victim, and hold Starller accountable.

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